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CAMathories® Folktale Mathematics™

 

CAMathories® has published a series of story books that is part of a comprehensive CAMathories® Folktale Mathematics™ curriculum that teaches mathematics in an enjoyable and engaging way using folktales from various parts of the world.  CAMathories® Folktale Mathematics™ offers a research-informed approach to traditional mathematics classroom pedagogy and at the same time supports diversity and inclusion for one world.

Series 1: Count and Recite 1 to 5 (3-4 years old)

There are 3 books in this series.

 “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” (from Britain), “Paco and the Giant Chili Plant” (from Mexico), “5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon” (from China). 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Goldilocks and the Three Bears front cover. Part of the CAMathories® Folktale Mathematics™ series

“Goldilocks and the Three Bears” is a popular British folktale that tells how a young girl went into the Three Bears' Cottage and we learn about what she found there. Readers will be counting up to 3 with Goldilocks.

Goldilocks and the Three Bears front cover
Goldilocks and the Three Bears first page which reads 'A folktale from Britain. Authors: Lorna Ayton, Ph.D (Cantab), David Whitebread, Ph.D. Illustrator: Adeeba.' CAMathories logo 'Mathematical stories from historic Cambridge'.
Goldilocks and the Three Bears example page which reads 'One morning, the bears made three bowls of porridge. One. Two. Three. But it was too hot to eat! The bears decided to go for a walk in the forest to get some fresh air and wait for the porridge to cool down.'
Goldilocks and the Three Bears example image of three bears
Goldilocks and the Three Bears example page which reads 'She saw the table with three chairs. One. Two. Three. And on it were three bowls of porridge. One. Two. Three. Goldilocks wanted to sit at the table. Do you think she should sit in the very very big chair, the very very little chair or the chair that's just right? Goldilocks then ate some three spoonfuls of porridge. One. Two. Three. Yum, yum, yum.'
Goldilocks and the Three Bears example image of Goldilocks choosing a chair to sit in

Paco and the Giant Chili Plant

Front cover of Paco and the Giant Chili Plant

“Paco and the Giant Chili Plants” is a Mexican folktale about an adventure of a young Mexican boy, Paco, who received magical chili plant seeds and ultimately climbed up to the sky where he met a giant! Readers will count groups of up to 5 with Paco during his amazing adventure. This series helps readers to develop an awareness of the principle of ‘order irrelevance’ – we can count things in any order but the number stays the same.

Front cover of Paco and the Giant Chili Plant
First page from Paco and the Giant Chili Plant which says 'A folktale from Mexico. Author: Helen Bradford, Ph.D. Illustrator: Vishesh Mehra.' CAMathories logo.
Example page from Paco and the Giant Chili Plant which says '"I do have these five magic chili seeds." "Why are they magic?" asked Paco. "Plant them and see!" said the old man. And with that, he handed Paco a small bag, gave him a wink with his eye, and took the cow away with him.' There is a picture of Paco and the old man.
Example page from Paco and the Giant Chili Plant which says 'Paco hurried home and planted the seeds in the field behind his house. The sun shone. Paco watered the seeds.' There is a drawing of Paco planting seeds under a sun.
Example page from Paco and the Giant Chili Plant which says 'And he waited for the chili plants to grow. He waited and he waited and he waited. Nada, nada, nothing.' There is a drawing of the seeds under the earth and sun.
Example page from Paco and the Giant Chili Plant with a drawing of a man standing on clouds.

5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon

Front cover of 5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon.

In “5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon”, a group of playful and funny little monkeys made a silly mistake. They thought that the moon had fallen into a well and then they tried to catch the moon! Readers count 1 to 5 and recite the string of number words to five. This series helps readers to develop an awareness of the principle of ‘order irrelevance’ – we can count things in any order but the number stays the same. 

Front cover of 5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon.
First page of 5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon which says 'A folktale from China. Author: Penny Coltman, MEd. Res. (Cantab) Illustrator: Sally Tsoi.' CAMathories logo.
Example page of 5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon which says 'The youngest monkey ran off on his own and found a deep well of water. He leaned over the side of the well and gazed at the water far below him. (This was quite a dangerous thing to do! He could so easily have fallen in!) All of a sudden, the youngest monkey spotted something and called out to his brothers.
Example page of 5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon with a drawing of five monkeys looking at a moon in a well.
Example page of 5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon which says '"Let me hold onto your arms," suggested the next monkey. "Then I might be able to rescue the moon." He wrapped his tail around the oldest monkey's stretched out arms and dangled into the well. He stretched and stretched as far as he could, but he could not reach the moon in the water.'
Example page of 5 Little Monkeys Catching the Moon with a drawing of two monkeys hanging from a tree trying to reach into a well.

Series 2: Keeping Count 1 to 5 (3-4 years old)

This series help readers to develop an awareness of the "stable order" principle - we always say the numbers in same stable order. The series also help students to further practice counting things that are not objects, such as actions or movement, and things that can not be seen, for example, sounds.

There are 3 books in this series.

"The Story of the Twin Girls" (from India), "The Story of the Leopard's Spots" (from Ghana, Africa) and "The Kind Fox and the Little Cat" (from Ukraine).

The Story of the Twin Sisters

Book cover for The Story of the Twin Sisters by Helen Bradford Ph.D. Adeebo with a drawing of two girls

"The Story of the Twin Sisters" is based on a folktale from India. It tells the story of Haldi and Adarak, twin sisters with very different approaches to helping their grandparents. The book will support children to learn to confidently recount numbers to five. They will understand that five objects will always remain five objects, no matter how they are organised, as Haldi journeys from her home to her grandparents' and back again.

One day, Haldi suggested to Adarak that they visit their grandparents. "We haven't seen them for so long." said Haldi. "We could take them some gifts." "You go," said Adarak, grumpily. "They live so far away. I will stay here and go another time."
So Haldi wrapped five gifts for her grandparents. She wrapped each gift in brown paper to make one, two, three, four, five parcels. She could not find a basket to put them in, so she tucked them under her arm, and began the long journey to her grandparents' home. What do you think the gift inside each parcel is?
Drawing of two girls. One girl is smiling with a thought bubble saying "5 miles to grandparents' home". The other has her arms folded in disagreement.
Drawing of five wrapped presents.
Along the way, she came upon an oven, full of baking loaves. "Little girl! Little girl!" called out the loaves. "Please take us out of here! Do take us out or we shall be burnt!" Now Haldi was a kind, thoughtful girl. She stopped carefully put down her five parcels one at a time and took out all the loaves of bread from the oven. "Thank you," sighed the five loaves. "That feels much better " "Your're welcome," said Haldi.
A drawing of girl by an oven. The oven contains 5 loaves, one of which is saying "help".
She counted the loaves, one, two, three, four, five. Then she picked up her parcels, one, two, three, four five, and went on her way.
A drawing of a girl with five loaves and five presents

The Kind Fox and the Little Cat

Cover_The_Kind_Fox_and_the_Little_Cat.jpg

In this story, a kind fox helps a little cat who has nowhere to live. Some animals think their new little cat neighbour is fierce and plan a trap to catch her. They prepare a delicious feast for the kind fox and the little cat aiming to trick them. Practice counting to five as you learn how the two friends manage to scare off the other animals and enjoy the feast all to themselves!

Once upon a time there was a little black cat. She lived with an old farmer on a farm near a wood.
But the little cat started to get older and she could not run quite so fast. When she chased the mice they ran faster than her, and when she pounced on them they slipped away and laughed. One day she only caught two mice. Which 2 mice do you think she caught? Count as you touch them.
A farmer and black cat in front of a house in the forest
A black cat surrounded by laughing mice
The little cat told the fox her story. "Don't worry," he said. "I will help you." And that good, caring fox built a hut with a garden for himself and the little cat to live in.
A black cat and a fox in front of a hut.
The wild boar then chased some picnickers. They had a plate of colourful pysansky eggs. These are hard boiled eggs that have been beautifully decorated. The wild boar stole five of the delicious eggs. "Those are very pretty eggs," he said. "We'll have one each at our feast." What a wicked wild boar he was to take those eggs! Choose five eggs for the wild boar to pick up. Count them as you touch them. The wild boar put the five eggs in a bag to take to the feast.
A wild boar and a picnic table with a bowl of eggs on it
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